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kropotkindersurprise:

Hundreds of Romanian anti-fracking protesters break down the fences around a Chevron exploration site. Some 250 people gathered near the village of Pungesti chanting “Chevron go home. Following the incident, the US company later announced it was suspending activities in the area. 

kropotkindersurprise:

Hundreds of Romanian anti-fracking protesters break down the fences around a Chevron exploration site. Some 250 people gathered near the village of Pungesti chanting “Chevron go home. Following the incident, the US company later announced it was suspending activities in the area. 

girlsreallywant:

SOOOON <3

girlsreallywant:

SOOOON <3

popolvuhz:

MYTHS SERIES || La Llorona.

“Oh, my children, where will I take them to escape this doom?”she lamented.
The best antecedent known of the story of La Llorona legend has its roots in Aztec mythology. One version holds that it is the Aztec goddess Chihuacóatl, the protector of the race. They say that before the Spanish conquest, a female figure dressed in white began to appear regularly on the waters of Lake Texcoco roaming the hills and terrorizing the inhabitants of Tenochtitlan.
A group of priests decided to consult old omens. The ancient warned that the goddess Chihuacóalt would appear to announce the fall of the Aztec empire by men from the East. The apparition was the sixth sign of the end of the civilization. With the arrival of the Spaniards to America, and once finished the conquest of Tenochtitlan, the seat of the Aztec Empire, years later and after Doña Marina died, better known as the “Malinche” (a young Aztec that became lover of the Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes), it was said that she was the Llorona, who came to grieve from the other world for betraying her race, helping foreigners for their submission.
The “Other” Lloronas
This legend spread to other parts of the country, manifesting itself in various ways. In some towns, said the Llorona was a young lover who had died on the eve of the wedding and brought the crown of white roses she never used, to her groom.
Elsewhere, was believed to be a mother who came to mourn his orphan children.
Some say it is a woman who drowned her children one night and it’s seen along streams or creeks, exhaling long laments.
Others say is an unpleasant figure of a woman, tall and disheveled, using a long dress and with cadaverous face. Her long arms are holding a dead child and she spends the night crying, seeding with pitiful sobs, the terror on fields, villages, and even in cities. 

popolvuhz:

MYTHS SERIES || La Llorona.

“Oh, my children, where will I take them to escape this doom?”she lamented.

The best antecedent known of the story of La Llorona legend has its roots in Aztec mythology. One version holds that it is the Aztec goddess Chihuacóatl, the protector of the race. They say that before the Spanish conquest, a female figure dressed in white began to appear regularly on the waters of Lake Texcoco roaming the hills and terrorizing the inhabitants of Tenochtitlan.

A group of priests decided to consult old omens. The ancient warned that the goddess Chihuacóalt would appear to announce the fall of the Aztec empire by men from the East. The apparition was the sixth sign of the end of the civilization. With the arrival of the Spaniards to America, and once finished the conquest of Tenochtitlan, the seat of the Aztec Empire, years later and after Doña Marina died, better known as the “Malinche” (a young Aztec that became lover of the Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes), it was said that she was the Llorona, who came to grieve from the other world for betraying her race, helping foreigners for their submission.

The “Other” Lloronas

  • This legend spread to other parts of the country, manifesting itself in various ways. In some towns, said the Llorona was a young lover who had died on the eve of the wedding and brought the crown of white roses she never used, to her groom.
  • Elsewhere, was believed to be a mother who came to mourn his orphan children.
  • Some say it is a woman who drowned her children one night and it’s seen along streams or creeks, exhaling long laments.
  • Others say is an unpleasant figure of a woman, tall and disheveled, using a long dress and with cadaverous face. Her long arms are holding a dead child and she spends the night crying, seeding with pitiful sobs, the terror on fields, villages, and even in cities. 

d-ici-et-d-ailleurs:

Lila Downs - La llorona… 1994

Lila Downs est une chanteuse, auteure-compositrice mexicaine.

Weeping woman. Song was made long ago about a legend over 300 years old of a crying woman, love, death, and sometimes the drowning of children. The versions vary depending where you go south of the U.S. Mexico border. It’s a hauntingly beautiful song.

zainisaari:

BORDER SECURITY
A U.S. Border Patrol agent tries to tackle an undocumented immigrant in dense under brush on September 9, 2014 near Falfurrias, Texas. He missed but the immigrant was later caught by a fellow agent. Thousands of migrants continue to cross illegally from Mexico into the United States, and Texas’ Rio Grande Valley has more traffic than any other sector of the U.S.-Mexico border. John Moore/Getty Images

zainisaari:

BORDER SECURITY

A U.S. Border Patrol agent tries to tackle an undocumented immigrant in dense under brush on September 9, 2014 near Falfurrias, Texas. He missed but the immigrant was later caught by a fellow agent. Thousands of migrants continue to cross illegally from Mexico into the United States, and Texas’ Rio Grande Valley has more traffic than any other sector of the U.S.-Mexico border.
John Moore/Getty Images

iamnothingbutnatters:

Who is Dayani Cristal? is such an important documentary.

skepticalavenger:

Makes perfect sense to me.

skepticalavenger:

Makes perfect sense to me.

themagicfarawayttree:

Chichen Itza at Night by Alex Korolkovas on Fivehundredpx

themagicfarawayttree:

Chichen Itza at Night by Alex Korolkovas on Fivehundredpx

astronemma:

Saturn was really close in the sky to the Moon tonight! Here’s what I got with my ‘scope and phone camera.